marketing

Stumble upon Green Cheese

by Frank Dufay on March 16, 2009

in food

I was researching cheddar cheeses (I’m a cheesemonger, and I’m especially drawn to blues and cheddars), and I heard about this “great” raw cow’s milk cheddar made locally – good so far, but I’m a critic, and if people say it’s great, but I think it’s just good, it leads me to think it’s a let down (the whole expectation thing).

So, I finally got my hands on Fiscalini’s 18 month bandaged cheddar, and my eyes rolled back in my head when it hit my tongue – I had to take a good 90 seconds to let the waves of taste pass through my senses before I was able to begin to recuperate. Of course, I had to have another taste (or three) to evaluate the flavor – it’s amazing, but I won’t get into those details here.

The main reason I’m writing is to highlight how one can just be doing their thing and come across a truly great product, and then learn that not only is this product of fantastic quality, but it’s also a leading example of the pursuit of idealism – not idealism of “right” vs. “wrong” – but rather idealism of “this is what I think is right, so I will do it, setting an example without preaching, castigating or judging.”

It turns out that Fiscalini is an ultra-green farmstead cheese company . . . besides making exceptional cheese, they’re a pioneer in green practices (having been highlighted on CBS for their methane capture), and they’re the first American dairy certified for positive animal welfare. It seems this cheese maker puts its money where its mouth is.

The reason I’m writing is to highlight how you can just be doing your thing and come across a truly great product, and then learn that not only is this product of fantastic quality, but it’s also an example of a kind of idealism – not the idealism of “right vs. wrong,” but rather an idealism of “this is what I think is right, so I will do it,” leading by example without preaching, castigating or judging.

Sometimes, amid all the greenwashing out there, it’s hard to know who’s truly green vs. those who just put a green sticker on their box. There are lots of great green cheese makers out there – like Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Company, which is delicious and organic, Willow Hill Farm, making superb sheep’s milk cheese, and Crave Brothers, who’ve been featured on NBC – yet none of them have any green marketing on their labels. They are just good examples of how an individual or organization can make great stuff and pursue the best practices to the best of their ability, remain truly committed to their wares and the impact of their process, and allow the results to speak for themselves.

Frank

{ 1 comment }